By the time the March 8, 2019 bill filing deadline for the 86th Texas Legislature passed, many bills concerning the electric industry had been filed. Storage, cybersecurity of the electric grid, and capital project tax abatements are among the energy issues Texas lawmakers are considering. This reviews the major filed bills before the current Texas Legislature.

Continue Reading

In the latest of the eight-part Renewable Energy Projects Webinar Series, Husch Blackwell’s Chris Reeder and Linda Walsh will discuss the federal and state regulatory approvals often required for typical wind and solar energy projects. They will address the circumstances under which such regulatory approvals are required and the timing needed to apply for

President-elect Donald Trump’s appointment of Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt confirms that the Trump administration and its appointees will not continue to support attempts by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to address climate change.  Pruitt, who has referred to the debate regarding global warming as “far from settled,” has filed several lawsuits against EPA challenging regulations that limit such emissions from the coal, oil, and natural gas industries, including an EPA rule implementing the Clean Power Plan by requiring states to
Continue Reading

Energy storageMassachusetts took a significant step to acknowledge that effective and efficient renewable energy storage – the commercial capture of renewable energy to offset demand at a later time – can aid in the growth of wind and solar power and save ratepayers money. Massachusetts may become the third state to adopt a renewable energy storage mandate, following in the footsteps of California and Oregon. In August, the Massachusetts legislature passed a bill, titled “An Act to Promote Energy Diversity,” that gives the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER) the ability to mandate what the energy storage targets.
Continue Reading

ecological power plantAs noted in our March 24, 2016 client alert discussing possible opportunities under Cuba’s 2030 renewable energy plan (and published by Windpower Engineering & Development’s website here), new rules by the U.S. Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry & Security (BIS) and the U.S. Department of Treasury Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) permit U.S. companies to travel to Cuba without a license to perform market research, conduct marketing efforts and perform preliminary contract negotiations.

Now, scheduled flights to Cuba resume after more than 50 years, allowing interested U.S. businesses to begin networking and establishing relationships in Cuba while they wait for the licensing program and portfolio projects to take shape.
Continue Reading